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Dr. Dimitroff's Research Program is subdivided into (2) components:

Immune Research Program: His current research focus is to define the glycomic signature and function on human B cells.  Using lessons from his prior studies on T cell and HSC glycobiology, he is employing a battery of glycobiological tools to interrogate cell surface glycans and related lectin-binding partners on human B cell subsets.  The goal is identify a stage-specific glycomic signature and study its functional impact on B cell fate.  These findings will significantly impact our understanding of how glycobiology regulates long-lived humoral immunity, effective vaccination and B-lymphogenesis. 

Cancer Research Program: He is currently exploring the glycobiology of malignant melanoma.  He has obtained exciting preliminary data that the glycomic signature of melanoma cells is vastly different than most other common malignancies. The glycomics of melanoma cells are being interrogated structurally and functionally to discern whether a causal relationship drives melanoma virulence and metastasis.
  • Project 1:  Analysis of Cell Surface Glycans in Melanoma Malignancy & Metastasis
    The major goal in this project is to characterize cell surface glycans and their lectin-binding partners on malignant melanoma cells and determine whether identified lectin-glycan binding functionally relate to the malignant behavior and metastatic activity of melanoma cells.  The hope is that this work will result in a better understanding of melanoma development and perhaps, new treatments that target melanoma progression.
  • Project 2:  Studying Galectin Ligand Interactions and Human T cell Immunity
    The major goal of this project is to identify and characterize galectin ligands on human T cells and elucidate the downstream factors that influence effector fate and function upon galectin-binding.  The hope is that this work will unveil galectin-dependent effects that can be targeted to impact T cell-mediated diseases or boost anti-tumor immune responses. 
  • Project 3:  Glycomic Characterization of Human B cells 
    The major goal of this project is to identify and characterize glycomic features of human B cell subsets that mark their effector function or ability to differentiate/maintain effector function. 
  • Project 4: Studies on Galectin Ligand Interactions and B cell Immunity
    The major goal of this project is to identify and characterize galectin ligands on human B cells and elucidate downstream events that influence effector fate and function upon galectin-binding.  The hope is that this work will unveil galectin-dependent effects that can be targeted to strategically boost vaccination approaches or to antagonize B cell-mediated diseases or B-lymphomagenesis.  
  • Project 5:  Identifying & Characterizing Lectin-binding Glycans on Neutrophils
    The major goal of this project is to identify and characterize lectin-binding glycans on neutrophils that help regulate their fate and function in inflammation.  The hope is that this work will result in a better understanding of how neutrophilic glycans can be targeted to help neutralize their inflammatory activity.
  • Project 6:  Analysis of Lectin-binding Glycans on Tumor-Infiltrating Leukocytes  
    The major goal of this project is to identify and correlate the presence and level of distinct lectin-binding glycans on lymphoid/myeloid cells infiltrating human cancers with the clinical outcome of patients.  The hope is that this analysis will reveal why distinct glycans predict cancer progression.